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    How much Sugar, Calories & Alcohol in your drinks?

    How much Sugar, Calories & Alcohol in your drinks?

    We’ve heard it before; you are what you eat. Everything should be done in moderation - but how often do you check the sugar, calorie or alcohol content of your favourite food and beverages? 

    Most importantly, do you know how much of these ingredients you should be consuming and the effects they can have on your health if you have too much? 

    Just because it says sugar-free, low-fat or alcohol-free - doesn’t mean it’s good for you, which is why it’s so important to read the label.

    So, we compare our East Forged cold-brew teas with other popular drinks to uncover which are the healthiest of all.

    1. Sugar

    Top down view of a jar of sugar

    Too much sugar is bad for your health, and can lead to serious conditions likehigh blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. TheWorld Health Organization (WHO) recommends that ‘free’ or added sugars make up no more than 10% of our daily intake. 

    For an adult of healthy body mass index (BMI), this works out to be able 12 teaspoons or 50 grams of sugar per day.

    • What is Sugar?

    Sugars are carbohydrates that occur naturally in some foods likeYuzu fruit, but they can also be added to foods and beverages as a way to enhance flavour. Sugar is used by the body for energy, like carbs. Which means, eating too many sugars and not using the energy is a quick way to increase yourbody weight - and not in a good way. 

    This table shows the sugar content in some of our favourite drinks. They’re listed in order from least to most and you may be surprised to find G & T’s in the middle andalcohol-freebeer towards the end of this list!

    Beverage Type

    Sugar* - per average serve

    Beer (full strength)

    0 grams

    Still & sparkling water

    0 grams

    Black or herbal tea (no milk or sugar)

    0 grams

    Bourbon or Scotch (on ice)

    0 grams

    Vodka or gin

    0 grams

    East Forged

    0.3 grams

    Light beer

    0.3 grams

    Prosecco or champagne 

    1 - 1.5 grams

    Dry wine (white or red)

    1 – 1.5 grams

    Kombucha

    2 - 4 grams

    Cider

    12.8 grams

    Gin & Tonic

    14 grams

    Vitamin Water

    22 grams

    Espresso Martini

    25 grams

    Sweet wine (Moscato, rose)

    21 - 72 grams

    Mojito

    25 grams

    Commercial Ice-Tea

    26.4 grams

    Non-alcoholic beer

    28.5 grams

    Sports drinks

    35 grams

    Cola drinks (can)

    39 grams

    Energy Drink

    50 grams

    Ginger Beer

    64 grams

    Dessert wine (port)

    72 – 100 grams

    Even if the label says sugar-free or health drink it doesn’t mean that it’s good for you. These products normally contain fake sugars like Aspartame or Xylitol which are known to be very bad for you.

    2. Alcohol

    Friends enjoying drinks in the park

    Alcohol (ethanol or ethyl alcohol) is a depressant drug, which slows the messages between the brain and the body. It’s made by fermenting a natural source of sugar with yeast, which turns into carbon dioxide and ethyl alcohol. 

    According to the Department of Health guidelines, healthy men and women should drink no more than 10 standard drinks per week and no more than 4 standard drinks a day. 

    Well, we think that sounds like a lot, and probably not something you want to do every day! Roughly 20% of alcohol is absorbed through the stomach and the remaining 80% is absorbed through the small intestine. Alcohol is metabolised by the liver, where enzymes break down the alcohol. 

    • How does alcohol affect you?

    It depends on your age, health and how much you drink, but excessive consumption can have a negative impact on your physical and mental health and even increases the risk of illnesses like diabetes and cancer. 

    At the very least, drinking too much booze can lead to poor decision making, accidents, and injuries. Not to mention hangovers. In extreme cases it can even lead to alcohol poisoning and liver failure!

    In the table below we look a little closer at the alcohol content in some of our favourite drinks, in order from least to most. 

    Beverage Type

    % Alcohol - per average serve

    Still & sparkling water

    0%

    Black, green or herbal tea (no milk or sugar)

    0%

    East Forged

    0%

    Vitamin Water

    0%

    Commercial Ice-Tea

    0%

    Sports drinks

    0%

    Cola drinks (can)

    0%

    Energy Drink

    0%

    Non-alcoholic beer*

    0 - 0.5%

    Kombucha*

    0 - 0.5%

    Ginger Beer*

    0 – 4.%

    Cider

    4 – 6%

    Light beer

    4.2%

    Beer (full strength)

    4.5 – 5%

    Sweet wine (Moscato, rose)

    10 – 12%

    Gin & Tonic

    10 - 13%

    Dry wine (white or red)

    11 – 14%

    Prosecco or champagne 

    12%

    Mojito

    10 - 15%

    Dessert wine (port)

    14%

    Espresso Martini

    30%

    Bourbon or Scotch (on ice)

    40%

    Vodka or gin

    40%

    * Some of these drinks contain small quantities of alcohol, up to 0.5% alcohol by volume (ABV), but are able to be labelled as non-alcoholic according toFood Standards Australia New Zealand 

    3. Calories

    Set of gold scales on coloured table

    A calorie is a unit of energy and it's a way of describing how much energy your body  gets from eating or drinking. When you eat more calories than you need, your body stores the extra calories as body fat. In fact, even fat-free foods have a lot of calories.

    It’s estimated that adult women should eat 2,000 calories per day and adult men should eat 2,500 calories per day., but it all depends how active the person is. If you’re trying to lose weight, eating less calories will be helpful, but it also depends on what you eat and how much exercise or physical activity you will do. In case you're wondering, 1 calorie is equal to 4.2 kilojoules. 

    • Trackers

    There are lots of freeapps available that allow you track  your calories or kilojoule intake, as well as onlinecalculators can provide recommendations based on your height, sex, weight and fitness. 

    We recommend talking to a medical professional - such as a GP or nutritionist -  before making any lifestyle or big health changes.  

    See the number of calories in some of your favourite drinks -

    Beverage Type

    Calories - per average serve

    Still & sparkling water

    0

    Black, green or herbal tea (no milk or sugar)

    1

    East Forged

    5

    Kombucha

    30 – 120

    Non-alcoholic beer

    40

    Dessert wine (port)

    50

    Vodka or gin (on ice)

    64

    Bourbon or Scotch (on ice)

    70 - 97

    Prosecco or champagne 

    80

    Sports drinks

    80

    Sweet wine (Moscato, rose)

    96

    Light beer

    100

    Espresso Martini

    103

    Energy Drink

    110

    Vitamin Water

    120

    Cola drinks (can)

    140

    Gin & Tonic

    148

    Beer (full strength)

    150

    Dry wine (white or red)

    160

    Ginger Beer

    164

    Mojito

    168

    Commercial Ice-Tea

    188

    Cider

    210

     

    And the healthiest drinks are…

    Information is power! Knowing exactly what’s in your food and beverages is so important to be able to make the best choices for you and your health goals! So what’s the final verdict – what are the healthiest beverages around? 

    Our top 5 drinks to enjoy if you’re keeping an eye on your sugar, calorie and alcohol intake: 

    1. Still or sparkling/ soda water - add fresh mint, and a slice of lemon or lime to zhuzh it up a bit 
    2. Black, green or herbal tea - choose a quality loose-leaf and there’ll be no need for milk or sweetener
    3. East Forged – shake, psssch, pour… it’s fun,alcohol free, low in sugar and calories too. Get your East Forged today.
    4. Kombucha– check the ingredients list first  for sugar and calories content
    5. Light beer – may be lower in sugar and alcohol content, but still high in calories

    Check out the full comparison table below.

    Beverage Type Sugar* - grams per average serve Alcohol - % per average serve Calories - per average serve
    Still & sparkling water 0 0% 0
    Black, green or herbal tea (no milk or sugar) 0 0% 1
    East Forged 0.3 0% 5
    Kombucha 4 0 - 0.5% 30 – 120
    Light beer 0.3 4.20% 100
    Beer (full strength) 0 4.5 – 5% 150
    Prosecco or champagne  1.5 12% 80
    Vodka or gin 0 40% 64
    Bourbon or Scotch (on ice) 0 40% 70 - 97
    Dry wine (white or red) 1.5 11 – 14% 160
    Cider 12.8 4 – 6% 210
    Gin & Tonic 14 10 - 13% 148
    Sweet wine (Moscato, rose) 21 10 – 12% 96
    Vitamin Water 22 0% 120
    Espresso Martini 22 30% 103
    Mojito 25 10 - 15% 168
    Commercial Ice-Tea 26.4 0% 188
    Non-alcoholic beer 28.5 0 - 0.5% 40
    Sports drinks 35 0% 80
    Cola Drink (can) 39 0% 140
    Energy Drink 50 0% 110
    Ginger Beer 64 0 – 4.% 164
    Dessert wine (port) 72 14% 50


     

    Mia Ferreira Blog ContributorContributing Guest Author:

    Mia Ferreira is a Professional Writer, PR and Social Media Consultant and a dedicated Iyengar Yoga teacher based in Melbourne. She is currently enrolled in the prestigious Professional Writing & Editing course at RMIT - with the dream of becoming a published author on day. Mia is also a self-confessed tea addict!